Irish Famine and Cottier Cabins Exhibition

The “Irish Famine and Cottier Cabins” virtual exhibition brings together leading experts who explore the lives of some of Ireland’s poorest and most vulnerable people during the Great Hunger in the 1840s and the cottier cabins (third and fourth class housing) they inhabited on a North/South basis.

In this series of videos, discover how the cabins’ occupants endured the Famine as reflected in their vernacular architecture and sparse furnishings, archaeological remains, folk memory, and visual and literary arts. Learn more about the archaeological excavations and archival records of famine era evictions and emigration from the Strokestown Park Estate, home of the National Famine Museum.

I) the Single Room Cabin from Altahoney townland in the Sperrin Mountains in the Ulster American Folk Park,

II) the Meenagarragh’s Cottier’s House in the Ulster Folk Park

III) An Bothán (recreation of a famine mud cabin) erected on the University College Cork campus, and

IV) the Cabin of the Poor in the Irish Agricultural Museum and Famine Exhibition at Johnstown Castle Estate, Museum & Gardens, Co. Wexford,  an Irish Heritage Trust property.

The Irish Famine and Cottier Cabins exhibition is hosted by the National Famine Museum at Strokestown Park, the Irish Agricultural Museum at Johnstown Castle, Estate & Gardens, and the Irish Heritage Trust. It is supported by the Department of Culture, Heritage & the Gaeltacht under the 2020 Cooperation with Northern Ireland Funding Scheme.

Learn more and watch the videos here.

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Notice

Due to Covid-19 Level 5 restrictions, Strokestown Park House, Gardens and the National Famine Museum remain closed until further notice.
Our Parklands remain open 7 days a week.
We would like to reassure you that the health and wellbeing of our visitors and staff continue to be our priority.